SOSAS

About SOSAS

Southern Oregon Sports and Spine in Ashland Oregon offers an integrated, caring approach to pain management to give your body the tools it needs to feel better. Formerly known as Heller Chiropractic, we have been a staple of the community for over 30 years.

Beating the Winter Blues

Do you tend to get the winter blues? Are you sluggish, have no energy, or sink into a funk? You may gain a few pounds. Your immune system seems to have gone on strike, and you catch every little bug. If you get the flu, it’s even worse, and can take weeks and weeks [...]

2020-08-23T16:05:46-07:00January 31st, 2018|

Flexion-Intolerant Lower Back Pain (Part2): Exercise Rehab

Waiter's bow exercise Marc’s article is the second of a series on flexion-intolerant lower back pain.  We emphasize the basic things the patient has to learn or re-learn in their own movement patterns, in order to heal a disc or flexion-intolerant lower back. I had a patient, who had moved away, and then [...]

2020-08-23T15:36:57-07:00March 25th, 2014|

Diagnosing Flexion-Intolerant Lower Back Pain (Part 1)

Waiter's bow exercise I have written several articles on this topic, but I keep learning more about this kind of back pain. This series, with help from Phillip Snell, DC, (www.fixyourownback.com) represent our current thinking on discogenic and/or flexion intolerant pain. We emphasize that you cannot recover from this without learning and using [...]

2020-08-23T15:37:13-07:00January 20th, 2014|

A Clinical View of Discogenic Pain

This abbreviated extract article from National Center for Biotechnology Information of a clinical study done in China is simple and fascinating. The goal of the study was to determine the natural path of proven discogenic pain, which in these patients was determined by discograms. This process is no longer routinely done in the US [...]

2020-08-23T15:52:05-07:00February 4th, 2013|

Cortisone Injections May Not Be the Answer

This is a very important article about cortisone injections and I don't know why it took me two years to find it. What it says is that cortisone shots are overused, and they often slow healing. Yes, the cortisone can give quick relief, but over several months, the patient who get the cortisone injections, [...]

2020-08-23T15:56:53-07:00January 24th, 2013|

The Truth About Salt

Big Brother (meaning the federal nutritional authorities) would like you to eat less salt, but the evidence is quite contradictory. I have always felt that salt intake is better done by taste than by some arbitrary rules. Generally, you would eat fewer prepared and junk foods, which are the sources of “stupid” salt as [...]

2020-08-23T16:00:39-07:00June 11th, 2012|

Another Source of Lower Back Pain

Another hidden source of lower back pain is irritation of the superior cluneal nerve, coming from dysfunction at the thoraco-lumbar junction. I have been working with the Maigne syndrome concept for at least 3 months, as of December 2011. It has made me see the integration of the thoraco-lumbar and the lower back and pelvis more clearly. If this concept is new to you, read my article first. Since writing the article, I have been observing my patients. Here are some thoughts. First, it is so wonderful to have a clear indicator. In this case, the clear indicator- Maigne’s gluteal point- is the hot spot, the knot, about 7-8 cm lateral to the midline, just below the iliac crest. If you don’t get rid of this knot, you have not succeeded.

2020-08-23T16:02:09-07:00March 8th, 2012|

Lower Back Pain: A Somewhat Unusual Case

A sixty-something-year-old male comes in with thoracic stiffness and lower back pain. The lower back pain would occur on various motions. He had previously been quite active, living on 3 acres and taking care of his property. He had been involved in a vehicle accident, rear ended, several months previous. His previous chiropractic care and massage had seemed to make him worse rather than better, he would spasm the day after the treatments. The key findings on exam included stiff hips, he couldn’t internally rotate beyond 10 degrees on both sides. He was very rigid throughout the thoracic spine. It was hard to elicit tenderness in the thoracic spine, as his muscles were so tight. His lumbar motion was fairly normal, with some pain at the extremes of motion.

2020-08-23T16:01:39-07:00March 8th, 2012|
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